{Book} ⚨ Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression º eBook or E-pub free

Growing up on a farm was a tough thing to do, but while people had it rough they made it work, and they were generally happy to do so This high spirited account of life during the depression was enjoyable in the beginning but slowly lost steam and, while during the depression, was not hard living compared with dust bowl literature They were frugal and did not have much but that was the way of life for a large family on a farm depression or no depression They were extremely self sufficient Growing up on a farm was a tough thing to do, but while people had it rough they made it work, and they were generally happy to do so This high spirited account of life during the depression was enjoyable in the beginning but slowly lost steam and, while during the depression, was not hard living compared with dust bowl literature They were frugal and did not have much but that was the way of life for a large family on a farm depression or no depression They were extremely self sufficient and there are many stories one could relate to if they grew up on a farm, but that wasn t me My mother grew up on a farm and I m sure this book would bring many memories back into her head even though she is about twenty years younger than Mildred Mildred Kalish s memoir of life on a farm during the Depression is packed with fascinating experiences and observations I loved the content, but was not crazy about her writing style, which often sounded to me like a transcription of an oral history But Kalish, a former English professor, does, in fact, know how to tell a story and share a recipe and give instructions on cleaning a sink She s friendly and chatty, and intersperses her observations with lots of very definite opinions and a Mildred Kalish s memoir of life on a farm during the Depression is packed with fascinating experiences and observations I loved the content, but was not crazy about her writing style, which often sounded to me like a transcription of an oral history But Kalish, a former English professor, does, in fact, know how to tell a story and share a recipe and give instructions on cleaning a sink She s friendly and chatty, and intersperses her observations with lots of very definite opinions and a sprinkling of sophisticated literary references And she absolutely won me over in the end with her chapter on raccoons, which just charmed me to pieces I would have loved a fewstories about the adults in her family In particular, her grandfather sounded wonderful and I wanted to knowabout him I also found the subtitle of this book to be somewhat misleading, as I kept waiting to hear about the hard times the family suffered Certainly, there were few luxuries and the daily chores were pretty daunting But the farm was close to self sufficient and I wonder if life would have been much different had there been no Depression The family never wanted for food and Mildred and her sister had a new pair of patent leather Mary Janes every year In the end, however, I would not have missed this book for the world It evokes images and experiences of a very special time and place where families including small children worked together to ensure their livelihood, people lived in close and respectful relationship with nature, and thrift was a creative, responsible and matter of fact way of life This IS like listening to your grandma or that old lady in the Titanic movie telling in a gentle, slow cadenced voice, about the old days Some topics covered are thrift, medicine, chores, farm food, gathering wood, and wash day The book starts off entertaining, but like Grandma or Grandpa it gets long winded and you start to feel bored and restless and wonder how muchyou are willing to sit through before you make the move for your coat You might decide that next time she repeats w This IS like listening to your grandma or that old lady in the Titanic movie telling in a gentle, slow cadenced voice, about the old days Some topics covered are thrift, medicine, chores, farm food, gathering wood, and wash day The book starts off entertaining, but like Grandma or Grandpa it gets long winded and you start to feel bored and restless and wonder how muchyou are willing to sit through before you make the move for your coat You might decide that next time she repeats waste not, want not, you ll head for the door But if you stick with this book through the dragging middle, you get to the best parts, the chapters called animal tales, raccoons and other critters, and Me She tells how they the kids in her family tamed raccoons the raccoons slept in bed with them The middle drags partly because she describes such obsolete practices and circumstances that it s hard to picture what she s talking about Like their oat shocking procedure, the mechanics of their laundy routine, and the parts of a windmill Parts of these sections read like how to manuals, including how to prepare various meals Her chapter called Me is the best, as it has the most human interest, telling about her place in the family and community and how she eventually left, had a job in New York City, went to college, jointed the coast guard and got married, etc What is ridiculous is that she puts this chapter as an epilogue Like, she s so modest that she can t have a place in the body of the book, it has to be tagged at the end Like, Here s a tiny bit about little ol me if you care to knowYeah, thanks, that s why I picked up this book An outstanding memoir for a rural Iowa childhood in the 1930 s One thing we children all understood The adults were the ones who made the decisions and the generation gap was not to be breached Childhood and early adolescence were looked on as a kind of unmentionable affliction, somewhat like the huge goiter that tilted Great Aunt Maggie s chin way up in the air it was there for all to see, but no one ever commented on it The desired condition was to be an adult We also understood that we An outstanding memoir for a rural Iowa childhood in the 1930 s One thing we children all understood The adults were the ones who made the decisions and the generation gap was not to be breached Childhood and early adolescence were looked on as a kind of unmentionable affliction, somewhat like the huge goiter that tilted Great Aunt Maggie s chin way up in the air it was there for all to see, but no one ever commented on it The desired condition was to be an adult We also understood that we couldn t do or have anything that cost money Nor could we ever suggest to the old folks that we were bored or didn t have anything to occupy ourselves, for in no time they would have had us restacking the woodpile, scrubbing the porches, or picking up fallen apples Even before the saying was coined, we knew that adults were in some ways the natural enemies of kids We were, therefore, remarkably creative especially on the farm This is a short section of page 215 And it s an after thought oversight to her wonderful and structured tale of the years when she was one of the little kids BIG kids had other jobs, tasks, group rules and staggered allowances or permissions for fun and also when bridging the Big kid jobs in both the dual 1 2 year lifestyle of either the farm or thein town homestead of abode from just after Christmas to May They lived from Jan to May in one and from May to Dec in the farmstead out.Loving and depth of telling in this memoir Both are superb of every minutia and detailing For her ancestry, her siblings, her cousins, her aunts and uncles and in some ways so poignant for her own self identity and knowledge all the hierarchy, the work and the morality structure You need to have and hold the patience for reading immense detail in tasking and procedures on the farm and in the village For living without electricity and with continual water retrieval and outhouse normalcy constant occupations Chores were parts of living and took up hours and hours of every day s time Kids all had chores for each part of every day Not to mention that the cows milking and separation of milk the milk separator s wash of removals reassembly scalding being done every single day was a minor kids chore , 3 meals from scratch garden produce picking and cleaning in carried water before they got to the house was an everyday kids chore all the rest of the chickens livestock s feeding and care needed to be done every single day Holiday or not Chores still occupied their hours And their hours And on the special days too Like the day to clean the cemetery and do the nut gathering and cleaning Or the day to pick beans Or the other day to pick beans Can you tell I spent too many days in the last few decades picking beans Or the day to gather dead wood and fell 50 footers that were on their way out anyway for winter s heating woodpile and splitting pile supply And the games contrived within the tasks of each physical task And the rules broken with the critters or just because of a dare I loved, loved, loved the Ted colt story And the one where they rode the creek down in a flash flood and were cut nearly to death by saw grass It was all great fun Work was life And often joyful Everybody worked all the time Even if ailing or peaked Unless you have a red line running up your leg and are on the dire medical condition soak chair platform in the kitchen Doctors Hospitals Only rarely, rarely and at death s door My childhood was exactly the same as this I can remember Quincy throat wraps All the hundreds and hundreds of practical applications the kids learned Not only for treating the body but for every house, field or natural world observation Like the poor terrier or the canary that landed on the wood burning stove top Quick reaction Although I was 20 years later and not rural, I so remember nearly all that Millie does It was very similar where I was and in the same amounts of family or home members No personal exemptions or special cases Everyone worked, and constantly A great gift for me was any TIME TO READ That was a tremendous and earned privilege Often rare to grasp.Millie self identity is so solidified in this memoir Her innocence and her good will and her knowledge of where she fit Millie did not and never had to find herself And the WISDOM for challenges the pain, the sickness, the lacks met They are incredible by the age of 10 And she sure wasn t alone in her joy of them either.You need to like and treasure minutia of detail to like this book to a 5 star as I did Recipes, how to clean and scrub a pig s head with a small scrub brush done at 8 or 9 years old and without any ewwwww connotations even allowed or tangent considered , all the uses of fried onions and poultices, potato planting instructions, how to get that nasty outside hull off of the black walnuts, how to work the windmill slot levers, how to raid a bumblebee NOT honeybee nest for its clear drops of heaven, how to split wood and use wedges, how to use Bon Ami for 100 different reasons, how to wrap tomato seeds in newspaper, how to choose the blue corn seeds for next year, what to do if you had accident to use the inside chamber pot when caught unawares, and 1000 s of other gently and not so gently described minutia of base food ingredients and how they were prepared and combined If you like birds, or goats, or pigs you will hear a lot about them too And also what a teacher s contract added up to in Benton County 1930 s Iowa All the chores and endless waiting on customers my childhood was quite similar And believe me, we certainly were not used, nor were we gypped I loved this book, and I hope all the people I gave it to as a Christmas present love it, too Reading through some of the reviews here, I notice that some people are irked by the folksy, chatty style of the author I found it charming maybe it sounds like you re sitting around talking to grandma So what Perhaps because I never got to sit around and talk to grandma about the good ol days myself and if I had, my grandmothers good ol days would have sounded nothing like this , I have a high I loved this book, and I hope all the people I gave it to as a Christmas present love it, too Reading through some of the reviews here, I notice that some people are irked by the folksy, chatty style of the author I found it charming maybe it sounds like you re sitting around talking to grandma So what Perhaps because I never got to sit around and talk to grandma about the good ol days myself and if I had, my grandmothers good ol days would have sounded nothing like this , I have a high nostalgia tolerance Bring it on If you don t see the appeal of it, you re never going to, and that s fine To each his her own Myself, I m grateful to the New York Times for ranking this among their top 10 books of the year, because I never would have picked it up otherwise The man at the cool little SF bookstore where I bought this book highly recommended it, so I was pretty excited about reading it I liked it at the beginning, but as it went on I disliked itandby the page The old woman who wrote the book had a serious age based superiority complex, and gets heavier and heavier on phrases like these days, people don t know about or today s Xs don t even compare to what we had back then or young people today don t understand hard work etc The man at the cool little SF bookstore where I bought this book highly recommended it, so I was pretty excited about reading it I liked it at the beginning, but as it went on I disliked itandby the page The old woman who wrote the book had a serious age based superiority complex, and gets heavier and heavier on phrases like these days, people don t know about or today s Xs don t even compare to what we had back then or young people today don t understand hard work etc etc Come on I mean it s nice to hear how things were different but sickeningly annoying to hear over and over how I just COULDN T understand Ugh I did on the other hand like learning about how they solved various problems on the farm although I think I could have gotten this info from my own family , and how to make things like head cheese weird One way to take the measure of community is to listen in on its use of language the folksy sayings that knit us together, the colloquialisms that inform, guide, chastise, amuse, and entertain us This quiet and quaint memoir was a lovely nod toward the good old days through the author s reminiscences of her childhood years on an Iowa farm Anyone who grew up during that time period or in a farming community or rural America will surely identify with Kalish s leisure stroll down memory lOne way to take the measure of community is to listen in on its use of language the folksy sayings that knit us together, the colloquialisms that inform, guide, chastise, amuse, and entertain us This quiet and quaint memoir was a lovely nod toward the good old days through the author s reminiscences of her childhood years on an Iowa farm Anyone who grew up during that time period or in a farming community or rural America will surely identify with Kalish s leisure stroll down memory lane Obviously, Kalish grew up several decades before I was even a twinkle in my Daddy s eye However, I fondly remember my youthful days in rural Oklahoma This book also sparked some good memories of summers spent on my great uncle s farm in Missouri And it also brought to mind some anecdotes both the author and my elders were fond of sayingUse it up wear it out make it do do without it Throughout the book, Kalish includes a bevy of old hymns, popular song lyrics, recopies, tried and true remedies, and jokes tooThe females were keepers of cleanliness, sobriety, manners, morals, and decorum I recall a joke that appeared on the back page of thePathfinderthat was told over and over again by Mama and her friends An Old Maidwas asked why she didn t try to find a husband Her reply was, I have a dog that growls, a chimney that smokes, a parrot that swears, and a cat that stays out all night Why do I need a husband Not everything in this quaint memoir was equally delightful and or appealing Some of the long toothed jawing expounding on medicinal tinctures, poultices, chicken plucking in great detail caused me to skip and skim But through those tedium pages, I found a couple recipes I d like to try Kind of like a flea market or swap mete some books you simply have to rummage through to find the gems And once you do, it makes it all worth it.Thank you Kim for the recommendation This was a good little trip down nostalgia lane THREE Strolling Down a Nostalgia Country Lane STARS If I were looking at this from a literary perspective, I d probably knock it down another star The writing isn t great the back in my day tone in particular gets irritating Most of the narrative focuses on farm chores, but the epilogue alludes to a farinteresting story about the author s experiences during the war Maybe another book is forthcoming I think it is useful as a historical book, though It s strange to think how much life has changed in just two generations, and this book do If I were looking at this from a literary perspective, I d probably knock it down another star The writing isn t great the back in my day tone in particular gets irritating Most of the narrative focuses on farm chores, but the epilogue alludes to a farinteresting story about the author s experiences during the war Maybe another book is forthcoming I think it is useful as a historical book, though It s strange to think how much life has changed in just two generations, and this book does a thorough job of chronicling some major differences Our current attitudes towards health seem downright neurotic compared against those the author grew up with, for example It s not a bad read, and you ll have plenty to discuss with anyone else who has read it But wait until it s available at the library {Book} Î Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression ⚢ Story of hard times, high spirits on an Iowa farm during the great depression This sounds like a dreadful idearetired English teacher writes her first book, an account of her rural childhood The only reason I picked it up was the rave review in the New York Times What a fabulous memoir Her writing is utterly clear, and the events, both everyday and extraordinary, are fascinating.In a nutshell May baskets, outhouses, taming wild horses, treating puncture wounds don t go up the house to tell the adults, because they won t care just go to the barn and put some c This sounds like a dreadful idearetired English teacher writes her first book, an account of her rural childhood The only reason I picked it up was the rave review in the New York Times What a fabulous memoir Her writing is utterly clear, and the events, both everyday and extraordinary, are fascinating.In a nutshell May baskets, outhouses, taming wild horses, treating puncture wounds don t go up the house to tell the adults, because they won t care just go to the barn and put some cobwebs on it , singing hymns with two maiden aunts, getting lost in a blizzard, a mean missionary, gravestones, a one room schoolhouse, logging Do YOU know the difference between a widowmaker and a foolkiller Mildred does , a skunk fur collar, I yelled because I thought I had shot you , nut gathering, an accidental pipe bomb, recipes, and a stolen walnut tree.Check out the excerpt I listened to the audiobook, but that version does not seem to be widely available