{DOWNLOAD E-PUB} ⚸ Words to Outlive Us: Eyewitness Accounts from the Warsaw Ghetto ⚡ eBook or E-pub free

This is a fine collection of accounts, most of which have never been previously published, that really gave me the sense of what it was like to live and fight and die in the Warsaw ghetto The writers were a wide variety of people mostly Jews of course, but there were some gentiles, and even one young child and there were biographical sketches revealing details of each person s life and fate, if known Recommended for scholarly Holocaust collections. This book took me quite a while to finish because the accounts were quite scattered and the pages were large and thin It wasn t always gripping, but it was always the first hand real experiences of Jewish people who lived in and around Warsaw during WWII and that s a heavy enough topic for anyone. This book was recommended by author Gwen Edelman in her article, The Jews and the Second World War A Reading List , on the Jewishbookcouncil.org This author recommends a list of books the most powerful the most meaningful on the fate on the Jews during the Second World War Here is the link This book was recommended by author Gwen Edelman in her article, The Jews and the Second World War A Reading List , on the Jewishbookcouncil.org This author recommends a list of books the most powerful the most meaningful on the fate on the Jews during the Second World War Here is the link Slightly deceptive.NOT typical stories of the Warsaw ghetto It centers on individuals and not a people or the resistance Some of these accounts show great bravery while others just make one wonder just what the heck was going on.The women seem to be very brave and tough while several of the men wring their hands and wonder what to do.At one point a man sits on a sofa sobbing and pulling his hair out because he doesn t have a pair of pants.Extremely childish considering he could have been in a Slightly deceptive.NOT typical stories of the Warsaw ghetto It centers on individuals and not a people or the resistance Some of these accounts show great bravery while others just make one wonder just what the heck was going on.The women seem to be very brave and tough while several of the men wring their hands and wonder what to do.At one point a man sits on a sofa sobbing and pulling his hair out because he doesn t have a pair of pants.Extremely childish considering he could have been in a cattle car on his way to Treblinka As for the children in the ghettoPerhaps the parents should have made contact with Irena Sendler who was constantly taking children out of the Warsaw ghetto.Known by her code name Jolanta she was available at no charge StillThe horrors of the ghetto are heartwrenching and difficult to read.I judge no one No one should because unless you were there no can understand the choices people were forced to make I don t know how to rate this book It s based on personal accounts of events during the holocaust How can you feel good after reading this You can t. Incredibly harrowing and sobering read about life in Warsaw during WWII As a bit of a WWII history nut, it still never ceases to amaze me just how much evil occurred during the war. A haunting narrative of life in a Jewish ghetto, by some known authors and some anonymous whose voices tell of the horrors that humans can survive but also the voices of those who perished. a harrowing and heartbreaking read in parts The title has a lot of truth in itwords to outlive us and which should never be forgotten {DOWNLOAD E-PUB} Ö Words to Outlive Us: Eyewitness Accounts from the Warsaw Ghetto ë Book by In Michal Grynberg s mindblowing work Words To Outlive Us Eyewitness Accounts of the Warsaw Ghetto , he presents the reader with a disturbing collection of testimonies written by Jews during the infamous days of Nazi occupied Poland.The stories collected here are all true and written by Jewish people, both survivor and victim, bearing witness to the tragedies inflicted upon their community by the vicious Nazi regime.Ripped out of their homes, nearly all of their possessions, including furnitur In Michal Grynberg s mindblowing work Words To Outlive Us Eyewitness Accounts of the Warsaw Ghetto , he presents the reader with a disturbing collection of testimonies written by Jews during the infamous days of Nazi occupied Poland.The stories collected here are all true and written by Jewish people, both survivor and victim, bearing witness to the tragedies inflicted upon their community by the vicious Nazi regime.Ripped out of their homes, nearly all of their possessions, including furniture, clothes, and jewelry stolen from them the Jews of Warsaw were forced to live in an unbearingly crowded and filthy section of the city, referred to by everyone as the ghetto.Completely unprepared for the horrors the Nazis had in store for them, many Jewish families kept hoping that the inevitable was untrue some still felt that the Germans couldn t possibly slaughter innocent people But account after heartbreaking account testifies that that was exactly what they did Men, women, the elderly, and even young children and babies were massacred in the most brutal of ways Mothers had their children shot in front of their very eyes and whole families were sent to their deaths from a train station called Umschlangplatz to the dreaded Treblinka and other concentration camps.The stories collected in this volume were written by Jewish people who before the war, came from a wide variety of professions and family backgrounds, but because of the Nazis, were joined with each other in a common struggle amidst the starvation and terror that was the Warsaw ghetto From a young woman hiding in a bunker during the raging years of the war, trying to allay her misery with the written word and satire in the form of a weekly newsletter , to a haunted father distraught over the loss of his beloved wife and daughter to the death camps, these stories have been written by a people that witnessed the worst bestiality of modern times and determined throughout their struggle, to put down their experiences on paper for the world to one day see.Unlike sweeping histories of World War II and the Holocaust, this book reveals very specifically the day to day life of an average ghetto resident Completely stripped of their rights, the Jews of Warsaw were desperate for any work at all and proper documentation in order that their lives would be spared Factories were set up to benefit the German war cause that employed the Jews of the ghetto, and the stories tell of the desperation of the average Jewish person to find at least, a fairly decent factory to work in, that as the Nazis routinely said, would spare them from the feared deportations.Lie after lie would be told to the Jews by the Nazis, that they would be resettled to a different region and would work peacefully until the end of the war This would always result in being transported to the death camps In just one example such as the Hotel Polski disaster, Jews were put up at a local hotel and given papers to safe countries to emigrate to, such as Latin America, France, and even America Overjoyed at what they thought was a chance to escape, they rapidly discovered all too late that these promises were nothing but ploys to send them unknowingly to their deaths in the concentration camps.The Jews of the ghetto quickly learned never to believe the false promises of their German oppressors, and the vast majority began to build underground bunkers and various hiding places A good deal of them even managed to escape beyond their confines to what was called the Aryan side and live under assumed identities.These compelling accounts tell, however, that not all of the Jews decided to escape In April of 1943, Jewish fighting groups banded together for an uprising against the Nazis Determined to die defending themselves, they put up a valiant fight that lasted several months and killed many Germans This revolt ultimately failed however, and soon thereafter, the Nazis decided to liquidate the Warsaw ghetto.Reduced to smoking piles of ashes, the city lay in ruins There were Jews that survived however, in their cleverly built underground hiding places and who, on January 15th of 1945, lived to see the day of liberation by the Soviet army and Polish fighting forces.I felt when reading this book, that it was especially heart breaking to know the names and personal histories of the Jews who experienced this unbelievable slaughter These were mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, husbands, and wives who saw first hand the virulent evil human beings can perpetrate against each other Their lives are inspirational and tragic both terrifying and victorious For the common thread these people had, both survivor and victim alike, was a special spirit within them that even through the fiercest of oppression could never be snuffed out.Their words will speak to us forever and remind us to never forgetnever forget