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This was a rather dark mystery I love Melrose Plant Of all things he is a turf specialist for Jury in this story I did figure out the twist in the ending before hand Even though it wasn t a pleasant subject, it was a good mystery. I have read all of the Richard Jury series and have enjoyed them However, the last few, including this one, seem to be lagging I am tiring of the odd, precocious children that Grimes seems to feel impelled to include in every book Although the book is supposedly set in contemporary times computers, cell phones, etc , I get a very strong sense that Grimes is stuck in the past, and the book has the feel of the 30s or 40s instead Overall, I did enjoy the book, because I like the main characte I have read all of the Richard Jury series and have enjoyed them However, the last few, including this one, seem to be lagging I am tiring of the odd, precocious children that Grimes seems to feel impelled to include in every book Although the book is supposedly set in contemporary times computers, cell phones, etc , I get a very strong sense that Grimes is stuck in the past, and the book has the feel of the 30s or 40s instead Overall, I did enjoy the book, because I like the main characters so well, but my enthusiasm for the series is fading Although it s too early to tell after reading only my second Richard Jury mystery, my impression is that Martha Grimes seems to have hit upon a successful, reader pleasing formula which is not to say the results are formulaic The tales of crime seem to offer a framework onto which to pin her characters, many of whom turn up in the pages of one book after another, sometimes in similar situations, and all carefully and, one might say, affectionately described I look forward to encountering the Although it s too early to tell after reading only my second Richard Jury mystery, my impression is that Martha Grimes seems to have hit upon a successful, reader pleasing formula which is not to say the results are formulaic The tales of crime seem to offer a framework onto which to pin her characters, many of whom turn up in the pages of one book after another, sometimes in similar situations, and all carefully and, one might say, affectionately described I look forward to encountering these familiar faces as much as I do to discovering the latest story in which they re deeply entangled or not Chief Inspector Jury sensitively engages, not only with a fresh crowd of witnesses and suspects, but, happily, with the same dishy girl from the flat upstairs and the same dotty, old dear in the basement, another, similarly dishy girl in the squad room at work and his quirky, younger professional sidekick, even recurrent animals the dog in the flat, the cat in the squad room, the goat in the paddock, supplemented by other animals that skip, leap, and bound about and occasionally speak in individual books As Jury hurries about London and the countryside on British Rail, he seems also inevitably to end up sitting opposite a child, who offers further opportunity to indulge his subtly developed interpersonal skills despite protests of being out of his element among the very young Other characters have their own, rather particular parts to play Will the wealthy, landed gent Montrose always be enlisted to go under an extremely weak cover Last time it was as a horse buying, faux member of the British racing set, this time as a specialist in extremely arcane gardening techniques Martha Grimes equivalent of Mike Rowe on Dirty Jobs What will be next Road kill taxidermist I think I ve also figured out at least for now that scenes involving Montrose s stable of lovable verrry Brrrrritish eccentrics who populate the local pub in Piddlesworth under Twee or wherever are meant to serve up set pieces, offering relief from the plotted foreground no matter if their relationship to the story is tangential Grimes upper crust equivalents of Shakespeare s Bottom the weaver and other rude mechanicals to which, incidentally, the succession of hermits who occupy the folly on Montrose s estate offer aobvious comedic equivalent The plot this time is in no way comfortable a stable of 6 to 12 year old girls one shot in the back before page 1 , imprisoned in a house catering to pedophiles from England s top one percent There s also a murdered grown up and an abducted pre schooler, who fortunately eclipse the pedophilia subplot, with which they are thoroughly entangled But it s Jury, Wiggins, Mrs Wasserman, Carol anne, Stone woof , the cat Cyril who keep the pages turning The Winds of Change by an American crime writer called Martha Grimes the crime takes place in England but the investigating officers or should I say cops, if not themselves American speak in an American way has nothing to do with The Scorpions song, unless Ms Grimes took the title from the song, which would not surprise me, for I ask myself what is not plagiarised in this unpleasant, poorly written so called mystery It is the tale of child abduction, child prostitution and murder, recounted The Winds of Change by an American crime writer called Martha Grimes the crime takes place in England but the investigating officers or should I say cops, if not themselves American speak in an American way has nothing to do with The Scorpions song, unless Ms Grimes took the title from the song, which would not surprise me, for I ask myself what is not plagiarised in this unpleasant, poorly written so called mystery It is the tale of child abduction, child prostitution and murder, recounted with neither insight nor intelligence, nor for that matter plausibility I do not know what I can say in favour of this carelessly written, one dimensional and grim airport book It is my first and definitely last book by yet another jumper on the new generation whodunnit money milker best seller script for TV serial and thenmoney mystery thriller The last book which I had read in this clich ridden tradition was by P.D..James called The Murder Room For all the obvious faults and chlich s, P.D James does display intelligence in her descriptions of scenarios and motivations That isthan can be said for Martha Grimes, whose name in the tradition of many mystery thrillers suggests a salient characteristic of the personality I was not greatly impressed by PD James but she dazzles in talent compared with Martha Grimes tabloid style t.v crime script it grates to call this entertainment a novel Martha Grimes shares all the weaknesses of P.D James but has none of the latter s strengths We have the same implausible hardened but virtuous police inspectors, so badly drawn as characters and so implausible that they are interchangeable and unmemorable, confronted with uncompromising and crudely drawn evil so psychologically narrow as to be littlethan cardboard cutout devils, said inspector cum heros struggling with some personal problems while being very sensitive, loveable and literary philosophical when they are off duty P.D James hero Dagleesh or a similar name is a poet Martha Grimes goes one better and calls her hero Jury the presumably symbolically chosen name for her Tweedledum Officer He represents the condemnation of evil by the people get it and he is a philospher if you please I suppose that it is to make the hard jawed plodappealing to student readers and therefore boost sales by a hundred thousand or so The book is fine tuned to increase sales and all quality is sacrificed to that, assuming that is that the writer might be able otherwise to write a story of quality, which is frankly questionable In case anyone thinks I am negative because of the subject matter, I shall mention Michael Connelly Michael Connelly wrote a thriller the name escapes me with the same theme, but Connell s story was plausible, sounded authentic, with a fine eye for psychological plasuibility and atmosphere, and showed a fine eye for detail of place and character, all missing in Martha Grimes account In both the Martha Grimes and P.D James murder mysteries which I read, the guilty party was easy to spot, although since the murderer wasor less a caricature in the case of PD James and entirely a caricature in Martha Grimes, there was little interest in the murderer s being unmasked in marked contrast to Agatha Christie, who really did understand the vagaries of human nature In the case of Martha Grimes, the guilty party is all but revealed from the beginning, so it is questionable as to whether there can be a spoiler to a whodunnit so pat and obvious that it is not really a whodunit at all The unpleasant subject of the novel is laced with Daily Mail crusading tabloid spirit and voyeurism In an especially unpleasant denouement, Martha Grimes sets the reader up to agree with police officers violating liberal impediments to police abuse of power Jury enters a house without a search warrant and roughs up the person inside it which is all fine because the writer has made the victim so evil as to warrant every conceivable waiving of liberal protection and niceties In sum she sets up her villains as sufficiently appalling to get the reader nodding approvingly while reading about the methods of arrest employed by a police state.As if aware that she needs to lighten the dreary atmosphere she depicts, Martha Grimes makes an attempt at being funny a friend of the investigating officer I cannot remember if he is himself an officer or not and frankly can t even be bothered to check who is called Plant Ha Ha in one of too many implausible actions poses as a gardener in order toclosely observe the goings on at the house and gardens of a missing girl The humorous potential lies in the fact that Plant knows nothing about gardening and has chosen an exotic aspect of gardening in the hope that nobody else will question his bone fides The joke engineered by the writer is that he is constantly forced to bluff his way in conversation as an aficionado of his subject about which he knows nothing This is the sort of setting which one could expect in a P.G Wodehouse tale out of which P.G Wodehouse would have created hilarious scenes Alas, Martha Grimes is noa PG Wodehouse than she is an Agatha Christie, and the humour falls resoundingly flat It depresses me to know that junk writing such as this, as unhealthy for the brain as junk food for the body, is gobbled up by millions to ensure this writer s enjoys considerable creature comforts, which she undoubtedly does because her books sell well.The attempt at humour however is the one aspect of The Winds of Change which seems to be original, for the book borrows widely from previous and better writers, and much of it is plagiarism a highly implausible the book abounds in implausibilities conversation with a precocious schoolgirl recalls the talks with the disturbingly prococious Josephine in Agatha Christie s Crooked House The discovery of a body which the owners of the property cannot identify, recalls Agatha Christie s incomparably better book 4 50 from Paddington andrecently P.D James also better The Murder Room.I love books and it normally pains me to throw any away I have over 4000 books which I shelter from the hawk eyes of my wife, who is keen to swoop and destroy A book has to be very very bad for me to willingly take it out to the wheely bin of my own free will It means I even consider the book too bad to lend or try to sell The last novels I condemned were two numbingly senseless tales by someone called Tim Parks Martha Grimes now follows Tim Parks and evendeservedly My wife will be pleased Not too interesting2star They are such a great combination Richard Jury and Melrose Plant Between Plant s background sleuthing using his noble background and Jury s stubbornness, evil ends in a backdrop of sorrow I do love Martha Grimes Richard Jury series. This was darker then usual A child is murdered Pedophillia Nothing graphic, at least Not as much Plant as I d like I find Grimes writing so satisfying in the way she describes situations and thoughts, the humor, and the development of characters I love how she ends with the gang at the pub doing or saying crazy things The very ending was an excellent lead into the next book Only the dog came back. Another interesting book in the Richard Jury series I did get a little lost in a couple of places because I ve only read one of the other books, but there was enough information given for me to eventually fill in the gaps I look forward to reading other books in this series. Child abduction Human trafficking Pedophilia Child murder Martha Grimes series of so called cozy mysteries has certainly taken a turn to the dark side with the last two or three entries that I ve read None has been darker than this one, number 19, The Winds of Change.It starts with the inexplicable murder of a tiny girl Found cast aside like garbage on a London street, she s five or six years old and nameless No one immediately comes forward to claim her She has been shot in the back Child abduction Human trafficking Pedophilia Child murder Martha Grimes series of so called cozy mysteries has certainly taken a turn to the dark side with the last two or three entries that I ve read None has been darker than this one, number 19, The Winds of Change.It starts with the inexplicable murder of a tiny girl Found cast aside like garbage on a London street, she s five or six years old and nameless No one immediately comes forward to claim her She has been shot in the back Who would want to murder a small child Superintendent Richard Jury begins his investigation and soon learns that there is a pedophilia ring operating in the area A number of small girls are kept prisoner in a house to serve the sick desires of some of the local upstanding businessmen, but police have been unable to gather the evidence needed for probable cause to raid the house and break up the ring This began to remind me of one of Anne Perry s Victorian mysteries revolving around the victimization of women and children In the middle of his investigation, Jury is called by his friend, Commander Brian Macalvie, to come and help him with another mystery It s the murder of a young woman, killed on the grounds of a country estate She, too, is anonymous, as her body was found with no identification It soon emerges that the man who owns the estate where she was killed has been dogged by tragedy His stepdaughter, whom he adored, had apparently been kidnapped three years before, although no ransom demand was ever received Moreover, several months after that happened, the child s mother, his wife, died from a heart condition And who do you think is the child s father Well, it is none other than the chief pedophile of that odious ring in London Surely, all of this must be connected.Once again, Jury deploys his friend Melrose Plant as an undercover agent on the county estate This time he poses as a turf specialist to assist in the renovation of the gardens of the estate And once again, Melrose encounters an odd and charming child, a little girl, and her equally odd and charming dog, both of whom live on the estate Some things never change in a Grimes mystery Although some readers might find this tiresome after a while, I actually enjoy these quirky child and animal characters of hers They bring a touch of lightness and reality to her plots.And this plot certainly needed a little lightness There s not much time spent drinking and trading quips with the Long Piddleton crew at the old Jack and Hammer in this one, and there s precious little Cyril the Cat, nemesis of Jury s boss, Chief Superintendent Racer, and therefore loved by Jury and Racer s secretary, Fiona No, it definitely leans toward the dark side But it was an intriguing read, even though the plot had a few holes and the solution to the central mystery actually became pretty evident by about two thirds of the way through It proved to be another satisfying chapter in the Richard Jury saga ^DOWNLOAD ☘ The Winds of Change ↮ Richard Jury embarks on the darkest investigation of his career when the dead body of a young London girl leads to the cold case of a missing girl in Launceston an unsolved mystery that has haunted Police Officer Brian Macalvie for years